Donor Recognition and Tribute Book

Posted by on Dec 14, 2014 in Awards, Certificates, and Commissioned Works, Donor Recognition Art, News, Public Art, Visual Art | 0 comments

Donor Recognition and Tribute Book

L’dor va’Dor is the appropriate title of this book to honor donors and the names that appeared on plaques in a previous synagogue building which was destroyed by fire.  The wooden book was fabricated in Maine by Welch USA, and I quilted and painted the fabric insert.  The exterior brass binding seen below was crafted to match a border design that I developed for the main donor recognition wall. Shown here prior to being stretched and mounted into the wooden frame, this quilted silk was put together in a palette that matches the new building in which it is placed.  The words ‘L’dor vador’ (Generation to generation) are painted in gold with copper accents, and embellished with small clusters of Czech beads at the ‘waistlines’ of the letters....

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Feature/ Major Donor Recognition Wall

Posted by on Dec 14, 2014 in Donor Recognition Art, Jewish Ritual Art, News, Papercuts, Public Art, Visual Art | 0 comments

Feature/ Major Donor Recognition Wall

In 2013 I was charged with designing a 17′ X 8′ curved donor recognition wall for the recently completed Chisuk Emuna Congregation in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The finished design tells the story of the congregation’s 19th Century roots in Kovno, the various buildings that housed the congregation, and the values of the synagogue. The entire donor recognition system throughout the building is anchored here as the major donors who helped create the reality of a new home are honored between the art panels. Each designed panel measures two feet across and eight feet high and is fabricated from a variegated Formica and Youghiogheny art glass. The calligraphed words of the soaring central panel are incised into Corian.  The designs of the four decorative panels are based on traditional Jewish papercut art in that the imagery is all interconnected.  Welch USA, a signage company in Maine, brilliantly lasercut my full size designs and installed the completed wall, which is a single aspect of the donor recognition system. Photo above by Daniel Shanken. Please note:  This artwork is copyright protected and may not be reproduced without permission.  Thank...

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Primary Donor Wall – The Residence, Harrisburg, PA

Posted by on Jun 10, 2011 in Donor Recognition Art, News, Papercuts, Public Art | 0 comments

Primary Donor Wall – The Residence, Harrisburg, PA

The central roundel of this wall is a brass-colored vinyl cut out backed by marble and mounted on wood.   From the outside working towards center it is composed of the Biblical Seven Species, a geometric design based on the papercuts of early 20th Century artist Boruch Tzvi Ring, and a star design similar to one in a 200-year-old chased metal bowl from Damascus.  All the imagery reinforces the concept of the continuity of life and Jewish spirit.  Parts of the image have been reproduced throughout the independent living center on other signage.  (Fabricated by Welch Architectural Signage) When designing for a public space, the artwork must not only be pleasing and invite exploration, but it must be fabricated to be low maintenance and have great longevity.   For donor recognition purposes, it must also fit the culture of the institution, the setting in which it will be installed, and it should compel people to become donors and have their names added to the wall....

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Secondary Donor Wall, Abramson Center

Posted by on Jun 10, 2011 in Donor Recognition Art, News, Public Art, Visual Art | 0 comments

Secondary Donor Wall, Abramson Center

The connection to tradition in this series of very clean and contemporary wall plaques is the use of imagery and a visual style that hearkens back to heritage.   The seven species, of course, is a recognizable image from Torah, and the use of a style reminiscent of Eastern European papercutting carries the tradition, unbroken into the present. How amazing it is that we live in a time when laser cutters can produce long-lasting and low maintenance public art that connects us directly to generations of Jewish artists who came before us?

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Secondary Donor Wall, The Jewish Home, Harrisburg

Posted by on Jun 10, 2011 in Donor Recognition Art, News, Public Art, Visual Art | 0 comments

Secondary Donor Wall, The Jewish Home, Harrisburg

The purpose of this donor wall is just what it says at the top – to honor heritage and build the future.   When the facility was totally renovated, this wall became necessary as a way of carrying the names of former donors into the future while encouraging new gifts. The oval panel at the top is a watercolor painting of the seven species, echoing the theme of the main donor wall and creating visual interest on a wall that is otherwise without vibrant color.   Commissioned work like this requires an ability to collaborate with architects and designers to produce a ‘look’ that fits the space and serves a purpose....

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Primary Donor Wall – The Jewish Home, Harrisburg

Posted by on Jun 10, 2011 in Donor Recognition Art, News, Public Art, Visual Art | 0 comments

Primary Donor Wall – The Jewish Home, Harrisburg

A five foot high oval watercolor painting anchors the donor recognition system at the Jewish Home in Harrisburg, PA.  It’s mounted in a wooden oval frame and my Hebrew and English lettered text and an acrylic crown are mounted on the surface to create more visual interest and depth.   Great care went into choosing the subject matter and wording, and the painting is hung to face people as they enter the Home.   It’s mounted low enough on the wall to grab the attention of residents in wheelchairs who often stop with their families and examine the Biblical fruits and grains painted in lifelike color. The painting was finished and had to be delivered to Welch Signage in Maine for final assembly. It was scheduled to be shipped for arrival on September 17, 2001.   Do you remember the tenor of the nation in the wake of 9/11?   The painting was attached to a 4 X 6 foot frame I had built to keep it from warping while painting, and it needed to be shipped in a custom crate.  There were no planes flying and UPS was not permitted to transport any packages over a certain size that they did not wrap and verify.   I was able to find one local shipper who promised to build a crate, vouch for the contents, and truck the painting north to arrive on...

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